The opioid crisis in our nation has received a lot of attention by lawmakers in recent years. Opioid misuse could lead to a deadly overdose, which we all want to work to prevent. However, when it comes to an overdose death, the delicate question of whether the drug dealer who provided the deceased with the drug should be held responsible for that death.

What is drug induced homicide?

Under Minnesota law, if you are the proximate cause of the overdose death of another person by either directly or indirectly providing that person with a Schedule I or Schedule II drug, you may be charged with third-degree murder. This true even if you never intended for that person to die.

The consequences for such crimes are serious. A person in such a situation could face a prison sentence of up to 25 years and/or a fine of up to $40,000. These are serious penalties for an act that you never intended to lead to death.

Seek legal assistance when you are in serious trouble

Ultimately, overdose deaths are something we as a public should all take action to prevent. However, it is important to understand when such deaths constitute a crime. A drug dealer may never have intended to cause an overdose death, but even so, if an overdose death occurs, they could be charged with the very serious crime of third-degree homicide.

The information contained in this post is for educational purposes only, so if you are facing charges of drug induced homicide you will want to seek the advice of a seasoned and aggressive criminal defense attorney. Drug induced homicides in Minnesota are tough cases, so it is important that you have the assistance of a legal advocate who will fight tirelessly for your rights when you are in serious trouble.